Understanding Mental Health in the Office
14th September, 2020

The subject of mental health is increasingly becoming to our doorstep than we know. We see this evidently as we work in an environment where we deal with numerous adult mental health and young children (Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services also known as CAMHs)  through our vast NHS contacts. We have seen a surge in the number of professional equipment purchases. This equipment has served to help improve people’s state of mind through project work. Most recently, we worked on the implementation of outside gym equipment and an indoor kitchen centre to get young people communicating through food, taking older patients in rural areas and, garage workshop to help the young test their technical abilities as well as give them some positive achievements. This project was done for Aneurin Bevan University Health Board.

Image depicting young people volunteering in a mental health services programme to improve mental health awareness.

Image depicting young people volunteering in a mental health services programme to improve mental health awareness.

There are over 54 NHS mental health organisations in the UK. We are working on multiple varied programmes to help improve mental health in as many areas as we can.

Does mental health exist in my work place?

In order for me to understand the scope of this, I completed a short interview with my colleagues to understand their experiences of mental health.

The fact of the matter is, I typically spend more time with my work colleagues than my own partner, children or immediate family. As such, it is important for me to understand their experiences, which will help me deliver some real-life examples.

To protect the confidentiality of my colleagues, names will not be exposed.  

Interviewer 1

What experience of mental health have you witnessed/experienced?
Personally, there have been many people that I have witnessed than have been hit by mental health including, my closest and dearest. However, in my opinion, I have been brought up in an extremely stable family unit and with my experiences of dealing with stress and how to help myself or others, it comes down to talking to people in a calm and positive manner and helping them eradicate some stress levels. I am no doctor or expert but if you can get people smiling or laughing you’re half way there.

In reference to this subject, there has always been a talking point, is it nature or nurture and I sit on the fence with this one being 50/50.

How can you improve this?

I remember someone explaining the 70-20-10% rule of stress management in a Prince’s Trust course I attended, and it always stuck with me.
The course lead explained that 70% of the stressors that affect people are not worth worrying about. 20% of people’s stressors are based on issues such as bills, mortgages, and work to name a few. The other 10% relates to stress factors linked to the loss of a family member or close friend or the catching of a terrible illness.
This explanation helped me to better understand how to deal with stress. My main way of dealing with matters that can affect my mental well-being is through exercise.

Interviewer 2

What experience of mental health have you witnessed/experienced?

A few years back, I volunteered in a programme at Fly Cheese Studio. The aim of the programme was to teach 3D animation to children with learning difficulties. Approximately 7-10 students were enrolled with learning difficulties such as ADHD and autism. This experience taught me a lot and helped me to understand how to approach and understand mental health issues.

How can you improve this?

I think people’s understanding and interpretation of mental health needs improving. Initially, I did not know what to expect going into an environment where people had mental health issues. After going through my volunteer experience, I realised that there are different levels to the issues faced in mental health. In some cases, different individuals may require more one-on-one attention than others. Some students required me to go the extra mile in trying to understand their learning styles. Overall, I believe that mental health is manageable once you understand the individual. Underneath, those struggling with mental health are normal people just like me and you.

Interviewer 3

What experience of mental health have you witnessed/experienced?

I have had quite a few experiences witnessing mental health issues. I have a sister in London who works with students with SEND (Special Educational Needs and/or Disabilities). Many of the students within her workspace have extreme learning and behavioural disorders. Learning about her on-the-job experiences has really transformed my perspective of mental health issues especially when it comes to young people. I have come to the realisation that it takes special people to work with individuals with special needs.

How can you improve this?

I definitely think more needs to be done to ensure people are more aware of mental health issues. I think this starts with one’s mind set. Personally, I have taken a stance to be more open-minded to the fact that everyone has struggles that affect their mental wellbeing. It is so important to factor in that just because people may be unwilling to share their personal ordeals, does not mean they do not exist. Ultimately, I try to be pleasant and understanding with people I come in to contact with. The slightest interaction can make or ruin someone’s day.

In conclusion, the team at Niche Office Solutions Ltd, have had a range of experiences that have shaped their perception of mental health. From working with mental health NHS trusts to volunteering in programmes to supporting loved ones who work closely in the support of mental health, our collective experiences has helped us understand the importance of doing everything we can to increase mental health awareness within and outside of the workplace.

Backlink

Backlink

Backlink