Life-Size Knee Joint Training Model

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Model Number: 8477543

Brand: Niche Healthcare

Demonstrate abduction, anteversion, retroversion, internal / external rotation. Include flexible, artificial ligaments. Life-size, on stand.

SKU: NH-48772 Category: Tag:

Description

Categories         Anatomical Model

Subject               Medical Science

Material              Eco-friendly PVC

Application       School/Hospital/Laboratory

 

The knee joint is one of the largest and most complex joints in the human body. It is primarily a hinge joint but also allows for some rotational movement. Here’s a detailed look at its anatomy, function, and associated ligaments:

 

Anatomy of the Knee Joint

Bones Involved:

  • Femur: The thigh bone.
  • Tibia: The shin bone.
  • Patella: The kneecap.
  • Fibula: The smaller bone of the lower leg (not directly involved in the knee joint but provides attachment points for ligaments).

Joint Articulations:

  • Tibiofemoral Joint: The main hinge joint between the femur and tibia.
  • Patellofemoral Joint: The joint between the patella and the femur.

Movements

  • Flexion: Bending the knee, decreasing the angle between the thigh and lower leg.
  • Extension: Straightening the knee, increasing the angle between the thigh and lower leg.
  • Slight Rotation: Occurs when the knee is flexed.

Ligaments of the Knee Joint

Collateral Ligaments:

Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL):

  • Location: Runs from the medial epicondyle of the femur to the medial condyle and surface of the tibia.
  • Function: Stabilizes the knee against valgus (inward) forces.

Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL):

  • Location: Runs from the lateral epicondyle of the femur to the head of the fibula.
  • Function: Stabilizes the knee against varus (outward) forces.

Cruciate Ligaments:

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL):

  • Location: Runs from the anterior intercondylar area of the tibia to the posterior part of the inner side of the lateral condyle of the femur.
  • Function: Prevents anterior displacement of the tibia relative to the femur.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL):

  • Location: Runs from the posterior intercondylar area of the tibia to the inner side of the medial condyle of the femur.
  • Function: Prevents posterior displacement of the tibia relative to the femur.

Patellar Ligament:

  • Location: Extends from the patella to the tibial tuberosity.
  • Function: Connects the patella to the tibia and helps in the extension of the knee.

Menisci:

  • Medial Meniscus: C-shaped cartilage between the medial femoral condyle and medial tibial plateau.
  • Lateral Meniscus: Nearly circular cartilage between the lateral femoral condyle and lateral tibial plateau.
  • Function: Act as shock absorbers, distribute weight, and improve the stability of the knee.

Bursae

  • Suprapatellar Bursa: Above the patella, reduces friction between the femur and the quadriceps tendon.
  • Prepatellar Bursa: In front of the patella, reduces friction between the skin and the patella.
  • Infrapatellar Bursa: Below the patella, reduces friction between the patellar ligament and the tibia.

Muscles Involved

  • Quadriceps Femoris: Primary extensor muscles of the knee, located at the front of the thigh.
  • Hamstrings: Primary flexor muscles of the knee, located at the back of the thigh.
  • Gastrocnemius: Assists in knee flexion and is located in the calf.
  • Popliteus: Helps in unlocking the knee from a fully extended position.

Functionality

The knee joint’s primary function is to facilitate movement and provide stability. It supports the body’s weight during standing, walking, running, and jumping. Proper functioning of the knee joint and its ligaments is essential for maintaining mobility and balance.

Clinical Relevance

Injuries to the knee joint, such as ligament tears (ACL, MCL), meniscal tears, fractures, or bursitis, can significantly impair mobility and may require medical intervention, physical therapy, or surgery for proper healing and restoration of function.

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For more information, contact us 01274 965089 or check out our website at www.nicheofficesolutions.co.uk www.nicheofficesolutions.co.uk/niche-nhs

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